New QuickBooks Hosting: The Worst Intuit Mistake (updated)

Filed in Intuit QuickBooks, Xero by on April 2, 2010

Here is the link to my many prior posts on the New QuickBooks Hosting.

I have a long history with Our Intuit Friends. Intuit CEO Brad Smith and Former CEO Steve Bennet<span13.0pt;font-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif””> wrote this about me, “You’re fantastic Mike. Absolutely fantastic!” and “Keep raising hell when Intuit does something wrong!” 

<span13.0pt;font-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif””>I have been using, and teaching others to use, Intuit products almost since Intuit began, 27 years ago. The last 13 years were very exciting, due to many ways in which top Intuit execs let me help Intuit revolutionize our lives. Unfortunately, Brad and I rarely write directly since he became CEO (two years after I said he would). I also have heard nothing from Intuit, for 9 days, about a prior post I delayed for Intuit comment. That is why I must now say my annual Happy Birthday to Brad, 4 days early, by releasing this.

The inspiring Intuit Mission and Operating Values changed once in 17 years. The perspective of 50 years in accounting, plus my relationship with Brad, Steve, Intuit founder Scott Cook, and many top Intuit execs, made me suggest one more change. The Intuit Mission is to, “Revolutionize how people manage their financial lives.” The increasing scope of Intuit products, and their links to other programs, may soon mean Intuit links to most commercial programs. This means the Intuit Mission should be to, “Revolutionize how people manage their lives” (not simply our financial lives). This is a big leap, as Intuit repeatedly beat Microsoft by concentrating on small business and personal financial programs. However, soon after I suggested the change, Brad used it in a major Intuit conference keynote.

Only twice, in 27 years, did an Intuit mistake make me keep fighting until there was change. I only do this if the Intuit mistake is so serious that it badly hurts users and Intuit, which makes Intuit less likely to keep helping us in the future. Unfortunately, our Intuit friends are now making their worst Intuit mistake ever, with the new QuickBooks hosting program. This Intuit mistake is especially tragic, as there is an easy solution to the underlying reason for this new QuickBooks hosting problem.

The QuickBooks Software License Agreement lets us use one copy of QuickBooks on our office and home computers, as long as only one person primarily uses it. However, some QuickBooks users steal from Intuit by violating QuickBooks copyrights. They do this by letting different users excessively take turns using QuickBooks, from different locations. The fastest and easiest way for Intuit to solve the many new QuickBooks hosting problems would be to create a program to detect such excessive use from different locations. No one should then argue if Intuit uses that data to bill these users for extra copies of QuickBooks. Of course, it also can disable QuickBooks if these users do not pay.

Please note, Internet tracing information already includes where your session begin, or whether you are masking your point of origin. A simple program also can tell if input is from the keyboard or a remote user. All you then need to add is a timer. It would be easy for such a program to see who may be working an occasional 12 hour day, from an office and a nearby home. It also would be easy for this program to see who may be using one copy of QuickBooks for 40 hours a week in the United States, and a second 40 hours a week in India or elsewhere. Of course, few work 80 hours a week for long, so there are many clues even without international use. Intuit could quickly and easily couple these programs to an automated billing – QuickBooks disabling program. The simple in-QuickBooks part of this would do no processing. It would simply log data for occasional batch status report transmission.

I feel sure Intuit would not use such programs the way dBase (Ashton Tate) once did. dBase led the microcomputer database market until it bought the best copy protection company. It said it would use their technology to erase hard drives of copyright violators. It only took a few days for it to erase the hard drive of a legitimate user. The related monetary and reputation damage soon killed dBase.

Instead of the logical and defensible timer program I favor, we have many Intuit mistakes in the new QuickBooks hosting program (the worst Intuit mistake ever). I cannot count all the Intuit mistakes, but here are ones about which I previously wrote:

 

<pmargin-bottom:0in;margin-left:22.5pt;margin-bottom:.0001pt;mso-add-space:auto; text-indent:-.25in;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanArial;mso-bidi-font-weight:bold”>1.    <spanbold”>It is an Intuit mistake to put the new QuickBooks Hosting on a TurboTax website, and not mention TurboTax <spanbold”>http://affiliates.turbotax.intuit.com/public_interface.html?pi=14&pic=107<spanbold”>. <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial;color:black; mso-bidi-font-weight:bold”>2.    <span”Times New Roman”;color:black;mso-bidi-font-weight:bold”>It was an Intuit mistake to say (initially) that the new QuickBooks hosting could only have five users at a time in a QuickBooks file SIMULTANEOUSLY. A friend called it the redundant Department of Redundancy. Intuit quickly corrected this when I pointed it out, as the new QuickBooks hosting program may host as many users as each QuickBooks version allows. <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial;color:black; mso-bidi-font-weight:bold”>3.    <span”Times New Roman”;color:black;mso-bidi-font-weight:bold”>It is an Intuit mistake to say the performance of the new QuickBooks hosting can approach the experience of QuickBooks on a local PC, when it only approaches the slower performance of local networked PCs. <pmargin-bottom:0in;margin-left:22.5pt;margin-bottom:.0001pt;mso-add-space:auto; text-indent:-.25in;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanArial;mso-bidi-font-weight:bold”>4.    <spanbold”>It also is an Intuit mistake to refer solely to Microsoft Terminal Services, for the new QuickBooks hosting. Citrix created the program that Microsoft licenses for these terminal services. However, studies show that the current Citrix product runs three to four times faster, with 73% less bandwidth. Our long QuickBooks hosting experience confirms its superiority. That is why Micosoft will soon offer Citix hosting at $28 per month, if they are not already doing so. My very good Citrix QuickBooks hosting provider adds excellent support for as little as $27 per user per month. Intuit Commercial Hosting Providers charge more than double this amount, for inferior products, so contact us for QuickBooks accounting software help with this.
 
<pmargin-bottom:0in;margin-left:22.5pt;margin-bottom:.0001pt;mso-add-space:auto; text-indent:-.25in;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″>5.  It was an Intuit mistake to let the initial AccountingWeb article, about the new QuickBooks hosting, to only mention one new QuickBooks hosting company. Intuit approved three companies before its new QuickBooks hosting announcement. <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>6.    <spancolor:black;mso-bidi-font-weight:bold”>It was an Intuit mistake to risk monopoly sanctions and incur extreme bad will, by licensing only two to three new QuickBooks hosting companies for three years. It knowingly did not require confidentiality during this period, so these companies had an outrageous unfair competitive advantage. Around a thousand companies provide QuickBooks and QuickBooks add-ons hosting. Many of kept trying to get Intuit to license them without success. As discussed below, Intuit did not object to their business, though it was criminalizing them. <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>7.    I only use QuickBooks 2010. However, QuickBooks Sunset Policies probably make more QuickBooks users unhappy than anything else. About 1.5 million of the 5 million QuickBooks users probably use QuickBooks 2006 or earlier. QuickBooks Sunset Policies mean they cannot get Intuit support, updates, tax tables, online banking, and more. These functions stop working each year in April, for versions released about 3.5 years earlier. Buy QuickBooks late in the year and you only get 2.5 years of full use. Many would accept new QuickBooks costs, but do not want new computers (for increasingly bigger QuickBooks programs) or learning new software. For them, terminal server and Citrix are ideal. They let old computers run the latest software. Instead, Intuit is going way beyond not providing support or turning off functions. Intuit is now dictating that the new QuickBooks Commercial Hosting companies not host old versions of QuickBooks. My South Florida QuickBooks Meetup is the largest such group. About two-thirds of those at a recent meeting said we still occasionally use QuickBooks 2006 and earlier versions. A major QuickBooks hosting company rep said that around 30% of their customers were using these old QuickBooks versions. Therefore, it is a very big Intuit mistake to prohibit them for new QuickBooks hosting. Unless this changes quickly, it should soon be a major focus of monopoly sanctions. <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>8.    It is an Intuit mistake to rent QuickBooks only to new QuickBooks hosting companies, so QuickBooks may soon be a rent-only product, with a three-year life or less. It is very big Intuit mistake to discriminate against both QuickBooks users and new QuickBooks hosting self-hosting companies this way. Intuit has large numbers of QuickBooks Online end users paying monthly. Therefore, I cannot think of any reason why it does not trust its Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisors and Intuit Solution Provider self-hosts with rentals. Likewise, there seems no reason why Intuit should trust QuickBooks desktop users less than it trusts QuickBooks Online users. This disparity should soon lead to monopoly sanctions. IBM faced that when Selectric typewriters had a far smaller market share than QuickBooks has now (95%), not to mention the effective 100% market share Intuit wants for QuickBooks hosting. <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>9.    It is a big Intuit mistake not to consider the more liberal and activist FTC, FCC, DOJ, and Supreme Court it will soon face over monopoly practices. <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>10.It was an Intuit mistake to have many top execs actively encourage expansion of the unlicensed QuickBooks hosting industry. I was one of the key people involved in the early encouragement, so I can testify about it. I also can testify about my repeated publicity, with the full knowledge and consent of top Intuit execs. The result was a massive expansion of the unlicensed QuickBooks hosting industry. Thinking that Intuit later had the ability, or even a legal right, to suppress this key information was a serious new QuickBooks hosting mistake. <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>11.It is a devastating Intuit mistake to have it act to criminalize the entire QuickBooks hosting industry. Many top Intuit execs knowingly acted to help rapidly expand this industry. They are now effectively treating all its participants as unlicensed criminal copyright violators. This means that, whether or not Intuit prosecutes participants in this industry, they each face potential large-scale criminal prosecution for past acts. <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>12.It is an Intuit mistake to ask Intuit Commercial Hosting Program to disclose highly detailed company financial and security information, while reserving the right to disclose this information publicly or to ACTUALLY compete with the companies. This would let Intuit disclose information on applicants to their competitors. The likely civil or criminal copyright prosecutions and monopoly actions may make this highly confidential information public, devastating companies and Intuit. The Intuit Commericial Hosting Request for Information also seems to suggest that Intuit seems to want QuickBooks hosting companies to have the type of data center that Internal Revenue requires before it exempts users of foreign tax preparers from some Internal Revenue rules. There is an official government estimated cost, of the value of the time needed to complete the application to establish that you have such a system, including related audits. That estimate is $150,000! This is not the cost of the data center, but the outrageous cost of the extra paperwork. How will end users feel when they realize that these arbitrary requirements vastly increase their costs? How will they feel when these requirements suggest that Intuit may be moving towards prescribing specific equipment. programs and procedures that desktop users must follow? <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>13.It is a big Intuit mistake to charge Intuit Commercial Hosting Program companies $18,000 initially, $5,000 a year, and $5 per customer per month, especially without agreeing that these are fixed fees. With the detailed information required, Intuit can decide exactly how much to squeeze these companies at any time. That can drive some or all of them out of business at any time. At best, these costs will make Intuit Commercial Hosting companies unable to compete with self-hosting companies, as discussed below. They also will not be able to compete with many who quickly, easily, and legally ignore the new QuickBooks hosting. I will soon show how this applies. <pmargin-left:4.5pt;line-height:13.55pt”><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif””>There are probably many more Intuit mistakes, about which I already wrote. However, it is time to discuss many new Intuit mistakes, in the new QuickBooks hosting program. <spanHYPERLINK”>Here are some of the worst Intuit mistakes in this new QuickBooks hosting program. They help make this the worst Intuit mistake ever. Intuit probably will correct some new Intuit mistakes quickly. It may take embarrassing major changes, litigation, and monopoly sanctions to fix others. A big series relates to Intuit creating new QuickBooks hosting for “Commercial hosting companies, Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisors, and Intuit Solution Providers.” <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>14.<spanbold”>Certified<spanmso-bidi-font-weight:bold”> QuickBooks ProAdvisors and Intuit Solution Providers can self-host clients with minimal Intuit fees. Does anyone else see the related funny Intuit mistakes? Intuit clearly intends to use the word Certified in connection with ProAdvisors and the new QuickBooks hosting. Yet it still runs a giant diploma mill, so 45,000 or so untested and largely untrained people can call themselves QuickBooks ProAdvisors. The untested so-called QuickBooks ProAdvisors do nothing to show any QuickBooks knowledge at all. They simply pay Intuit $449 per year. Intuit needs educational programs, like the QuickBooks ProAdvisor program, to support those wanting to learn QuickBooks for a QuickBooks consulting practice. However, despite the best efforts of many, this big Intuit mistake does not limit sales to those wanting to have or improve a QuickBooks consulting practice. Repeat Intuit surveys show that these untested clerks use this grossly misleading term to charge far more than similarly untested self-designated QuickBooks Consultants. This may mean that Intuit makes QuickBooks users waste $1 billion a year<spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif””>. It also severely damages Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisors, as there are only about a third as many of us as there are untested QuickBooks ProAdvisors. That is why I now sell a $1 eBook, or give it away, so you can get the one-user $849 QuickBooks Enterprise 10 for $449. You also get free copies of QuickBooks Premier Accountant and QuickBooks Online Plus, with the best Intuit U.S.-based tech support (far better than regular Enterprise support) and many free or highly discounted extras. You can use any number of these $449 one-user copies of Enterprise with each other, or with a five-user multiple copy of Enterprise. Do not thank me. Thank Intuit for knowingly cheapening the Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisor Program that we need<spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif””>. <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>15.<spanbold”>It is a big Intuit mistake to let Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisors and (QuickBooks Enterprise) Intuit Solution Providers self-host for only $200 initially and $100 a year, without Intuit Commercial Hosting Program documents. These almost unregulated companies can quickly become Intuit Commercial Hosting companies in reality. They can do so without completing the Intuit Commercial Hosting Program forms, meeting the data center requirements, or paying Intuit $18,000 initially, $5,000 a year, and $5 per client per month. It obviously would take me (or others) very little time to create a generic (white label) emailed QuickBooks newsletter for the “new clients” of such large scale self-hosts. A $1 monthly charge, for such a newsletter, would make anyone “a client” of these self hosts. In fact, TODAY I will AGAIN ask for my self-host application. If I can no longer get one, my friends will do  do so on my be  <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>16.One funny Intuit mistake is AGAIN acknowledging that it does not really trust its so-called (untested) QuickBooks ProAdvisors. This time it is doing so by not letting them self-host the new QuickBooks hosting. This is fully justified, as Intuit told my 2002-2003 QuickBooks Advisory Council that almost all QuickBooks user complaints involved these untested QuickBooks ProAdvisors. Our Council unanimously approved removing them from the Intuit referral database. Intuit did so, but later began again sending defenseless QuickBooks users to its untested, mislabeled, and overpriced clerks. Only very extended protests, by many active well-informed Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisors, got a senior Intuit exec to finally again remove the charlatans from the referral database. Excluding these untested Advisors from self-hosting means that the clients of the untested clerks must become clients of self-hosting Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisors, to avoid the far more costly new QuickBooks hosting Intuit Commercial Hosting providers. It also may mean Intuit is going to change the so-called QuickBooks ProAdvisor name. However, please join me in protesting (with your Comments here and via QuickBooks in-program and web feedback) until we have word this is being done. <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>17.An even funnier (or tragic) Intuit mistake involves QuickBooks Enterprise ISPs (Intuit Service Providers). They too do not have to show any QuickBooks knowledge. However, they must pay $2,500 a year. It looks like paying Intuit $2,500 a year makes you more trustworthy than paying it $449. <spanmso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-font-family: Calibri;mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-char-type:symbol;mso-symbol-font-family: Wingdings”>J  <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>18.Do you see other very funny Intuit mistakes? Who else did Intuit leave out of the new QuickBooks hosting program? The next big Intuit mistake leaves out ALL of the many companies who self-host QuickBooks in-house, using Windows Terminal Services or Citrix! Most such companies have no desire to seek outside new QuickBooks hosting Intuit Commercial Hosting Program companies. Certified <spanbold”>QuickBooks ProAdvisors and Intuit Solution Providers run very few of them. Intuit surely should not use its QuickBooks Software License Agreement to prohibit shared use of the in-house computer systems used by all these companies. <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>19.The next Intuit mistake deals with the foundation of the new QuickBooks hosting program. Intuit is using its QuickBooks Software License Agreement to prohibit the shared use of computer systems, except under the new QuickBooks hosting programs. This is questionable, since using any network computer, to house a shared QuickBooks data file, seems to violate the shared computer part of the QuickBooks Software License Agreement. <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;text-indent:-.25in;line-height:13.55pt; mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1″><spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”;mso-fareast-font-family:Arial”>20.A very big Intuit mistake relates to Intuit’s plan to apply the shared computer language, in the QuickBooks Software License Agreement, to the operating systems provided by Microsoft and Citrix. This is legally improper and completely hypocritical, because of something amazing. Intuit forgot how it uses network file servers. Network speeds are much slower than local computer speeds. Intuit is among the many that use client – server computing. It does this with a free network program for QuickBooks file servers. You see evidence of this program as soon as you start a QuickBooks install, with the questions about whether you want to install for shared use. Local QuickBooks programs normally use run each QuickBooks program command, on local QuickBooks data files. This becomes a big problem when you use a shared network file server. QuickBooks then must get many pieces of the network data file and write back many changes to it. The slow network speeds quickly become very slow as you add users. <pauto;margin-left:22.5pt;mso-add-space:auto;line-height:13.55pt”> QuickBooks behaves very differently in Network mode, when it detects the QuickBooks network program running on a network server, even if it is running on a file server. This network program lets the local QuickBooks copy use many macro program commands. These macro commands let the QuickBooks network program, on the network file server, run many QuickBooks program commands locally (on the file server), without constantly slowing down for network traffic. The network also better coordinates requests from different QuickBooks users, so QuickBooks runs MUCH faster. However, this means that every QuickBooks network file server, which uses this shared network program, runs an active program on a shared computer. That surely violates the hypocritical QuickBooks Software License Agreement prohibition of shared computer use, which underlies the entire new QuickBooks hosting program. In fact, there is only one major difference between the clearly allowed QuickBooks shared network hosting program and Microsoft Windows Terminal Services and Citrix. The difference is that the QuickBooks program works only for QuickBooks, while the other programs do the same thing for QuickBooks and non-QuickBooks programs. The other difference is that these Microsoft and Citrix programs do a better job. <pline-height:13.55pt”>I did not deliberately save the hysterical best for last on the new QuickBooks hosting, worst Intuit mistake. It only occurred to me while reading this for a last time. Are there any jailhouse lawyers who can guess what suddenly made me laugh so hard? Here is some white space to think. <pline-height:13.55pt”>  <pline-height:13.55pt”>  <pline-height:13.55pt”>  <pline-height:13.55pt”>  <pline-height:13.55pt”>Now, here are some clues: <pmargin-left:.5in;line-height:13.55pt”><span”Arial”,”sans-serif””>I had a ProSeries (TurboTax) Advisory Council meeting about 4.5 years ago. Almost all Council members liked my proposal to have Intuit provide terminal server hosting, with a package of its programs, directly or through third party hosting companies. More than 30 ProSeries execs attended the meeting, including the ProSeries Division head. Many liked the proposal. No one said a thing about terminal server violating the QuickBooks Software License Agreement. <pmargin-left:.5in;line-height:13.55pt”><span”Arial”,”sans-serif””>The next day I went on an all-day QuickBooks tour of ProSeries, with three of my QuickBooks terminal server hosting company execs. None of them signed a non-disclosure agreement. This effectively published our largely terminal server discussions to the world, voiding my non-disclosure agreement to the extent of these discussions. <pmargin-left:.5in;line-height:13.55pt”><span”Arial”,”sans-serif””>Our tour guide was an Intuit manager, appointed by the ProSeries Division head and a second senior ProSeries exec. Our discussion largely related to QuickBooks and terminal server. It included a discussion of the QuickBooks Software License Agreement prohibition on shared computer use. Instead of criticizing the apparent violations of the Agreement, the manager enthusiastically said that the QuickBooks and ProSeries terminal server package I proposed was, “a whale of an opportunity for Intuit.” He also said this was not something Intuit would do itself, so he encouraged our efforts. <pmargin-left:.5in;line-height:13.55pt”><span”Arial”,”sans-serif””>I quickly published many things about these discussions, after sending several posts to top Intuit execs for comment and due to confidentiality concerns. No one said not to publish this. <pmargin-left:.5in;line-height:13.55pt”><span”Arial”,”sans-serif””>This means that many Intuit execs encouraged fast growth in the QuickBooks terminal server industry, or knowingly let others do so. Some of the same execs are now responsible for the new QuickBooks hosting program. I do not believe there have been significant recent changes to applicable parts of the QuickBooks Software License Agreement. <pmargin-left:.5in;line-height:13.55pt”><span”Arial”,”sans-serif””>The basis for the new QuickBooks hosting program is that shared computer hosting violates the QuickBooks Software License Agreement. Copyright violations are serious criminal offenses. Related fines are many times the copyrighted property value. Victims of crimes cannot forgive them, thereby avoiding prosecution. No prior QuickBooks hosting company got an Intuit license before starting QuickBooks hosting. Based on the new QuickBooks hosting program Request for Information, it is unlikely that companies will get licensed in the future before starting QuickBooks hosting. Therefore, the top people in these companies are guilty of many serious crimes. This is not at all funny. Now here is some more white space to let you decide what I find so funny. <pline-height:13.55pt”>  <pline-height:13.55pt”>  <pline-height:13.55pt”>  <pline-height:13.55pt”>  <pline-height:13.55pt”>The hysterically funny Intuit mistake is that the top Intuit execs, who encouraged QuickBooks hosting criminals, are legally criminal co-conspirators! They are even more criminally liable than the well-meaning individuals that they encouraged to commit these countless criminal copyright violations. The only way they MAY avoid criminal liability is to make the QuickBooks Software License Agreement allow the unlicensed QuickBooks hosting they encouraged. This entrapment or criminal conspiracy should give every accused QuickBooks hosting criminal an absolute defense, while it kills the new QuickBooks hosting program. <pline-height:13.55pt”>I really wish these were the worst Intuit mistakes in the new QuickBooks hosting program. However, as Steve Bennet often says, the best (of the many new QuickBooks hosting incredible Intuit mistakes) is yet to come. That means you should keep reading and subscribing to the <spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif””>http://www.QuickBooks-Blog,com/. If this or other areas of QuickBooks, tax cuts, or grossly excessive government spending interest you, or if you catch one of MY many mistakes, please comment here. You also can contact us for QuickBooks accounting software help<spanfont-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif””> or anything else. <pline-height:13.55pt”>Your issue may well be my next article, especially if you show me I am wrong about ANY Intuit mistake concerning the new QuickBooks hosting, Worst Intuit Mistake. <pline-height:13.55pt”>                            – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –  <pline-height:13.55pt”>Google and many others like my QuickBooks Hosting Mistakes posts. After two days I had these links out of 618,000:
<pline-height:13.55pt”>Google #1 http://www.prlog.org/10610006-new-quickbooks-hosting-mistakes.html
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Google #15 http://1234567890.typepad.com/quickbooks/2009/08/quickbooks-speed-quickbooks-performance-quickbooks-errors-free-quickbooks-2010.html
                     QuickBooks Hosting Mistakes
Google #16 http://etradewire.org/
QuickBooks Hosting Mistakes
<pline-height:13.55pt”>Google and many others like my QuickBooks Hosting Mistake posts. After two days I had these links out of 249,000:

Google #1 http://www.prlog.org/10610006-new-quickbooks-hosting-mistakes.html
                    QuickBooks Hosting Mistake
Google #2 http://www.prlog.org/10609603-new-quickbooks-hosting-the-worst-intuit-mistake.html
QuickBooks Hosting Mistake
Google #3 http://insiderit.com/new-quickbooks-hosting-the-worst-intuit-mistake-prlog-free-press-release/ 
QuickBooks Hosting Mistake
Google #4 http://1234567890.typepad.com/quickbooks/quickbooks_hosting/
                    QuickBooks Hosting Mistake

Google #5 http://1234567890.typepad.com/quickbooks/quickbooks-2010/
                    QuickBooks Hosting Mistake
Google #6 http://www.congoo.com/news/addstorycomment.aspx?st=108516685&Channel_ID=23&Category_ID=341
                    QuickBooks Hosting Mistake
Google #7 http://www.newsvisitnow.com/new-quickbooks-hosting-the-worst-intuit-mistake/                                        QuickBooks Hosting Mistake
Google #8
 http://friendfeed.com/davidsredfern/822fd7b3/new-quickbooks-hosting-worst-intuit-mistake
QuickBooks Hosting Mistake
Google #9 http://friendfeed.com/davidsredfern/f93328e2/davidsredfern-new-quickbooks-hosting-worst                          QuickBooks Hosting Mistake

Google #11 http://1234567890.typepad.com/quickbooks/quickbooks-2010/
QuickBooks Hosting Mistake
Google #12 http://twitter.com/quickbooksnews
                    QuickBooks Hosting Mistake
Google #14 http://qts.blocktax-res.com/
                    QuickBooks Hosting Mistake

 

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Fastest, easiest, accurate, low-cost QuickBooks! Intuit - QuickBooks CEO, "You're fantastic Mike! Absolutely fantastic!" Tax fighting CPA.

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